Sophie Scholl: “Stand up for what you believe in even if you are standing alone”

Some days ago, I saw a very interesting theater play: “Sophie and me”, written by the Austrian author Ursula Kohlerts. The story is about a fictional friendship between the two German women Sophie School and Traudl Junge. Both of them have lived under the Nazi regime, but had never met each other in reality. The play brings them together to ask the audience the important question: What would you do?
The women get to know each other as young girls at a “Bund deutscher Mädchen” (League of the German girls) camp and become best friends. The following scenes show how both characters will develop in very different ways.

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Ossip Mandelstam: the tragic life of an incredible poet

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Some days ago, I went to the exhibition “Ossip Mandelstam – Wort und Schicksal (word and destiny)” in Heidelberg’s oldtown. The Jewish Russian poet and essayist was a student at Heidelberg University in 1909/10, and it was here that he started writing. His tragic life shows how much our lives are influenced by policy-makers and that beautiful art always finds a way to come to the surface.

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Hermann Hesse and the Maulbronn Monastery

I admire the German writer Hermann Hesse for a long time. That’s why I decided to visit Maulbronn Monastery (Kloster Maulbronn) where some crucial events of his early life took place. The monastery is one of the best preserved Medieval monastery complexes in Europe. Its construction commenced in 1147.

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We need new narratives

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I studied German and Comparative Literature at the University of Heidelberg. My Bachelor thesis was about the image of Indian women in German literature. A lot of German writers were fascinated by India and thought it would be like a paradise on Earth. Nevertheless, I found out that writers such as Goethe, Hesse and Mann showed a very one-sided image of Indian women.

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