Sophie Scholl: “Stand up for what you believe in even if you are standing alone”

Denkmal für die Geschwister Scholl und Christoph Probst als Teil des Weiße-Rose-Mahnmals
Monument to Hans and Sophie Scholl and the “White Rose”

Some days ago, I saw a very interesting theater play: “Sophie and me”, written by the Austrian author Ursula Kohlerts. The story is about a fictional friendship between the two German women Sophie School and Traudl Junge. Both of them have lived under the Nazi regime, but had never met each other in reality. The play brings them together to ask the audience the important question: What would you do?
The women get to know each other as young girls at a “Bund deutscher Mädchen” (League of the German girls) camp and become best friends. The following scenes show how both characters will develop in very different ways.

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The Rise of Racism and Xenophobia in Europe

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During my time in Prague, I had the chance to visit the Franz Kafka Museum. Kafka’s life demonstrates that multicultural societies are nothing new in Europe. Kafka was a Jew. His mother tongue was German. He was born in the Czech Republic. He died in Austria. Despite the lame rhetoric of racist and populist politicians, Europe was always home to people with fluid identities.

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Common Myths about Migration

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In the beginning of September, I was one out of 100 participants from 50 countries selected for the IOM Summer School on Migration Studies in Prague, Czech Republic.
IOM, established in 1951, is the leading inter-governmental organization in the field of migration and has more than 100 offices worldwide. IOM joined the United Nations on September 19, 2016. The IOM Summer School was a great opportunity for me to gain more knowledge about migration theories and policies. I could discuss the root causes of racism and xenophobia with scientists and share interesting stories with people who work in NGOs, refugee camps and detention centers worldwide.

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My Favorite Places in Berlin

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Berlin is a great place for young people and artists. There is so much to see and do, and every time I come back to the city, there are a lot of new places to explore! Here is a list of my all time favorite places in Berlin.

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The Atlas of Beauty

Since I found out about the photography project “The Atlas of beauty” by Mihaela Noroc, I cannot get enough of her stunning photographs of women from all over the world.

Mihaela, who grew up in Romania, quit her job three years ago, and started travelling around the world. Through her photography project she wants “to explore the unnoticed beauty which lies in people around us.” Her portrays reveal the amazing diversity of humanity. At the same time, the women’s stories show how similar we are in our thinking and feeling as human beings no matter where and under which circumstances we live our lives.

Ossip Mandelstam: The tragic Life of an incredible Poet

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Some days ago, I went to the exhibition “Ossip Mandelstam – Wort und Schicksal (word and destiny)” in Heidelberg’s oldtown. The Jewish Russian poet and essayist was a student at Heidelberg University in 1909/10, and it was here that he started writing. His tragic life shows how much our lives are influenced by policy-makers and that beautiful art always finds a way to come to the surface.

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